Ceta Wine And Spirits Agreement

The non-commercial market includes all retail businesses such as hypermarkets, supermarkets, convenience stores, mini-shopping, kiosks, wine and liquor stores, etc. Indeed, with the introduction of CETA, Canada has also decided to expand its existing GI regulations for wines and spirits to now allow for GIs applications for agricultural and food products. This means that more Italian food GIs can be protected in Canada. Interested applicants from any country, including Italy, can now apply for direct protection for their agri-food products, as hundreds of Italian applicants have successfully done over the years to preserve GI protection for wines and spirits in Canada. European consumers are increasingly attentive to their health, and this also applies to their choice of drinks. Sales of non-alcoholic and non-alcoholic beers and wines are improving among non-drinkers and people who manage their alcohol consumption and prefer the taste of beer to non-alcoholic beverages. German imports of Canadian beer (as well as for wines, spirits, KRGs, etc.) increased significantly during the last historical revision (2013-2017) .. . . .